All absolutely too overwhelming.

'Just because I got an Emmy nomination doesn't mean the lives of trans people aren't in peril every day.'

— Laverne Cox (via angerisbeautiful-79)

cuz we KNOW there’s gonna be waaaay too many people patting themselves on the back saying “ok the trans issue is solved we did a good job” because laverne cox got nominated like NOOOOO there are still are still trans people that need to be supported listened to loved and defended. there is still a culture of transphobia and transmisogyny that needs to be dismantled. work to be done. (via wocinsolidarity)

(via andythanfiction)

deepwithfuture:

The looks they give her!

(via broodqueen)

Nick meets the Big City, starting with the Metropolitan Opera.

graceebooks:

confusedtree:

image

image

The prophecy

(via andythanfiction)

fewthistle:

Building a sandcastle replica of the abbey at Mont Saint-Michel, France. 1948.

Photographer: Yale Joel

(via neonstorm)

nprontheroad:

This is what a meeting town looks like. Graettinger, IA. Non-RAGBRAI population: 844.

poisonappleprintshop:

A french twist with my Elemental Child Nuit crown.

(via eccentricoctopus)

nprontheroad:

And so it begins. Leaving Rock Valley. 6:30am

rhamphotheca:

Dead Trees Are Anything But Dead

by Dani Tinker

I recently learned that dead trees provide vital habitat for more than 1,000 species of wildlife nationwide. The two most common types of dead wood you’ll find in your yard, along a trail or at a park are snags (upright) and logs (on the ground).

Despite their name, dead trees are crawling with life. From the basking lizards on top to the beetles underneath, the list of wildlife that depend on logs feels endless. Here’s a sampling of what you may find if you explore a log more closely. What have you observed on, under or near a dead tree? …

(read more: National Wildlife Federation)

photographs by D. Tinker, Avelino Meastas, Philip Poinier, and Danielle Brigada

(via hobbitology)