emir-dynamite:

sharkchunks:

iandsharman:

notahoe:

my type of public transportation 

“Why were you late in today?”

“Oh, I got tied up on the subway…”

I was always 50/50 on whether to reblog this but the last comment pushed it to like 95/5 in favor.

"What’s our stop?"

"You’ll get off when I tell you to."

(via unfuckthereallife)

(via unfuckthereallife)

via nya-kin

socialjusticekoolaid:

On the one-month anniversary of Michael Brown’s death, his family gathered at the Ferguson Police Department to again demand justice for his murder. Where is Darren Wilson, and why has he still not been arrested? #farfromover #staywoke

(via thisiseverydayracism)

jesuisperdu:

richard bosman

(via bt7)

nprmusic:

Saturday marks two decades since Bad Boy Records released Ready to Die, the album that introduced the charismatic, exceptionally talented, gone too soon rapper Biggie Smalls to the world, and made him a star.

Photo: David Corio/Redferns

fallontonight:

Since it’s back-to-school time, Jimmy shares some books you probably should avoid this fall!

spiritual-hippie-girl:

Via Carly Bastiansen

(via treadingmoonwater)

t-harvey729:

For all the homies in another dimension

(via unfuckthereallife)

Anonymous asked: why do black people use you in the wrong context? such is "you ugly" instead of "you're ugly" I know u guys can differentiate, it's a nuisance

edwardspoonhands:

miniprof:

rsbenedict:

prettyboyshyflizzy:

you a bitch

It’s called copula deletion, or zero copula. Many languages and dialects, including Ancient Greek and Russian, delete the copula (the verb to be) when the context is obvious.

So an utterance like “you a bitch” in AAVE is not an example of a misused you, but an example of a sentence that deletes the copular verb (are), which is a perfectly valid thing to do in that dialect, just as deleting an /r/ after a vowel is a perfectly valid thing to do in an upper-class British dialect.

What’s more, it’s been shown that copula deletion occurs in AAVE exactly in those contexts where copula contraction occurs in so-called “Standard American English.” That is, the basic sentence “You are great” can become “You’re great” in SAE and “You great” in AAVE, but “I know who you are” cannot become “I know who you’re” in SAE, and according to reports, neither can you get “I know who you” in AAVE.

In other words, AAVE is a set of grammatical rules just as complex and systematic as SAE, and the widespread belief that it is not is nothing more than yet another manifestation of deeply internalized racism.

I love linguistics! 

brakken:

conquer yourself

(via unfuckthereallife)

via brakken